Cart Search

2019 Annual Conference

Cleveland

March 07-10, 2019

submit Remember my login

2019 SPE Annual Conference: The Myths of Photography and the American Dream / Major support by The Joy Family Legacy Foundation

Looking for a chapter event?

Past SPE Annual Conferences

2019 SPE Annual Conference Schedule

print this page

Presentations on Main Stage 4

Jeremiah Ariaz (Imagemaker) | Nicole Jean Hill (Imagemaker) | Marcella Hackbardt (Lecture)

Friday, March 08 - 1:30PM to 2:30PM
Hope Ballroom

Jeremiah Ariaz, "Louisiana Trail Riders"  (Imagemaker)
Black Trail Riding Clubs have their roots in Creole culture formed in South Louisiana in the 18th century. Today trail rides are an opportunity for generations of people to gather, celebrate, and ride horseback. The riders form a distinctive yet little-known sub-culture in Southwest Louisiana. The photographs reflects the Creole culture and the celebratory spirit of the trail rides while sharing one of the many histories in the American story that has largely remained untold.


Nicole Jean Hill, "The Lora Webb Nichols Photography Archive" (Imagemaker)
This presentation will examine the photography archive of a Wyoming frontierswoman, entrepreneur, homemaker and image-maker. Lora Webb Nichols (1883-1962) created and collected an archive of approximately 24,000 negatives in the mining town of Encampment. As early as 1906, Nichols was working for hire as a photographer for industrial documentation and family portraits, developing and printing from a darkroom she fashioned in the home she shared with her husband and their children. In 1925, Nichols established the Rocky Mountain Studio, a photography and photofinishing service, which was a focal point of the town throughout the 1920s and 1930s.


Marcella Hackbardt "Material, Meaning, and Mythos: Photographs of Fabric" (Lecture)
The history of photography abounds with images of fabric. Fabrics suggest a range of meanings and mythos, such as choice, agency, and anxieties on the part of the human subject, while also revealing economic complications or class, global cultures, and gendered, religious, or other social or normative influences. Fabric references include manifestations of veils, reveries on memory, sexual liberation or oppression, and the body as historical and media critique. Fabrics respond to form, function, fantasy, and faith, ultimately negotiating the nature of human preoccupations with what is hidden and what is revealed.

speakers

Jeremiah Ariaz
Jeremiah Ariaz
Marcella Hackbardt
Marcella Hackbardt
Nicole Jean Hill
Nicole Jean Hill

Email Sign Up

SPE email updates contain resources, news, and more!

About this piece

Comments about this piece

Dialogue and critique are important to the SPE mission.
Please join the conversation.

Exit Full Screen Mode